Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: Normal anatomy and clinical experience

A. L. Deutsch, D. Resnick, J. H. Mink, J. L. Berman, R. O. Cone, C. S. Resnik, L. Danzig, J. Guerra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

The glenohumeral joint was studied in 25 cadavers and 136 patients using computed arthrotomography (CAT) and conventional arthrotomography (AT) to assess shoulder instability. Cadaver shoulders were injected with air or latex, sectioned with a band saw, and normal articular anatomy outlined. CAT was performed in 81 patients and characterized the glenoid labrum as normal, abnormal, or detached in 38 of the 44 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy (sensitivity, 96%; accuracy, 86%). Hill-Sachs defects were seen in 20 out of 29 patients with anterior labral abnormalities, while bicipital tendon abnormalities were evident on CAT in 6. Of 55 patients who had AT, the status of the labrum was clarified in 13 of the 16 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy (sensitivity, 86%; accuracy, 81%). Both methods can characterize the labrum; however, CAT is more comprehensive and appears ideal for both detection of Hill-Sachs defects and imaging the bicipital tendon. CAT requires less technical expertise and radiation than AT and is tolerated better by patients in pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-609
Number of pages7
JournalRadiology
Volume153
Issue number3 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: Normal anatomy and clinical experience'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this