Comparison of outcomes of one-stage basilic vein transpositions and two-stage basilic vein transpositions

Fahad A. Syed, Christopher J. Smolock, Cassidy Duran, Javier E. Anaya-Ayala, Joseph J. Naoum, Tam T. Hyunh, Eric K. Peden, Mark G. Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Basilic vein transpositions (BVTs) provide autologous hemodialysis access in the upper extremity. We report and compare our experience using the two techniques that are commonly performed to create BVTs: the one-stage and the two-stage technique. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on patients who underwent BVT from June 2006 to June 2010 from a database of all patients undergoing dialysis access procedures. One hundred six patients, mean age of 54 years (41% male), who received upper-arm basilic vein-only transposition were identified and were stratified based on one-stage and two-stage BVTs. Anatomic outcomes and functionality were determined and compared between stages. Results: Seventy-seven patients underwent two-stage BVT, and 29 underwent one-stage BVT. Fifty-one percent and 79% of the two-stage group and the one-stage group, respectively, had had a previous failed ipsilateral permanent access. Catheter dialysis at time of surgery was 14% in one-stage BVT and 43% in two-stage BVT. Immediate technical success was obtained in all cases. The rate of primary failure was 21% in the one-stage group and 18% in the two-stage group. Reintervention rates for the one-stage group and the two-stage group were 62% and 66%, respectively. Primary patency for the one-stage group and the two-stage group at 1 year was 82% and 67%, at 2 years was 81% and 27%, and at 3 years was 51% and 18%, respectively. Secondary patency for the one-stage group and the two-stage group at 1 year was 91% and 81%, at 2 years was 80% and 61%, and at 3 years was 58% and 45%, respectively. Thirty-day mortality was 0% in both groups, and all-cause morbidity was 12% in both groups (counting all stages). Conclusion: One-stage BVTs have a similar number of initial failures and secondary interventions as two-stage BVTs. One-stage BVTs achieved better primary and cumulative patencies. There appears to be no advantage to a two-stage BVT in equally matched patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)852-857
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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