Comparison of lymphoid neoplasm classification: A blinded study between a community and an academic setting

J. D. Siebert, L. A.C. Harvey, P. A.S. Fishkin, J. A. Knost, A. Ehsan, B. N. Smir, F. E. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The revised European-American classification of lymphoid neoplasms has been reported as reproducible among expert pathologists and feasible in a community setting. We evaluated the reproducibility of lymphoid neoplasm diagnoses between a community and an academic center. We subtyped 188 lymphoid neoplasms using revised European-American classification criteria. Clinical findings, histologic or cytologic preparations, paraffin-section immunostains, and flow cytometry data were reviewed as appropriate. Diagnoses were compared only after completion of the study. Lymphoma subtype was concordant for 167 (88.8%) of 188 cases. Discordant cases included 15 B-cell 2 T-cell, and 4 Hodgkin lymphomas. For B-cell neoplasms, discordance was most often due to classifying diffuse large cell lymphoma as another aggressive subtype of lymphoma (n = 6), marginal zone lymphoma as another subtype (n = 4), or follicle center lymphoma grade II as grade III (n = 3). For Hodgkin disease, discordance was most often due to classifying nodular sclerosis as mixed cellularity type (n = 3). Comparison of community and academic center diagnoses demonstrated high concordance for most revised European-American classification subtypes. Some sources of discordance have been addressed in the new World Health Organization classification of neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)650-655
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of clinical pathology
Volume115
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Immunophenotype
  • Lymphoma classification
  • Reproducibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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