Comparison of Clinic, Home, and Deferred Language Treatment for Aphasia: A Veterans Administration Cooperative Study

Robert T. Wertz, David G. Weiss, James L. Aten, Robert H. Brookshire, Luis García Buñuel, Audrey L. Holland, Howard Greenbaum, Norman S. Barnes, Franklin J. Milianti, Richard Brannegan, Robert C. Marshall, Deanie Vogel, John Carter, John F. Kurtzke, Roy Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

165 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aphasic patients who met stringent selection criteria were assigned randomly to three groups: clinic treatment by a speech pathologist for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of no treatment; home treatment by a trained volunteer for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of no treatment; or deferred treatment for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of treatment by a speech pathologist. At 12 weeks after entry, language measures indicated that the clinic-treatment patients made significantly more improvement than did the deferred-treatment patients, and improvement in home-treatment patients did not differ significantly from either clinic- or deferred-treatment patients. At 24 weeks after entry, after deferred-treatment patients had received clinic treatment, there were no significant differences among the groups. These results suggest that clinic treatment for aphasia is efficacious, and delaying treatment for 12 weeks does not compromise ultimate improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-658
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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