Comparing multiple domains of social cognition in schizophrenic patients with vs. Without paranoid symptoms

Zahra Saffarian, Behrooz Dolatshahee, Abbas Pourshahbaz, David Leland Roberts, Najmeh Rastikerdar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Various investigations demonstrated social cognitive impairments in schizophrenic patients. The impairments in schizophrenia patients are also associated with an increase in paranoid symptoms. However, comparing multiple domains of social cognition in subtypes of schizophrenia has received less attention. Objectives: The current study aimed at comparing multiple domains of social cognition in schizophrenic patients and the normal population as well as schizophrenic patients with and without paranoid symptom. Methods: In this causal-comparative study, 44 schizophrenic patients with paranoid symptoms and 18 patients without paranoid symptom admitted to three schizophrenia care centers in Shiraz, from June 1st, 2017 to July 2nd, 2017 were evaluated. The control group included 38 staff of the studied centers. The research tools were the face emotion identification task, hinting task, and ambiguous intentions hostility questionnaire (AIHQ). Results: We used the multivariate analysis of variance to compare the functioning of the sample groups. Based on the results, schizophrenic patients with/without paranoid symptoms exhibited worse performance than normal individuals in emotion perception (P = 0.01, P = 0.01) and theory of mind (P = 0.01, P = 0.01) tasks; however, patients with and without paranoid symptoms did not differ in these tasks. With respect to AIHQ, schizophrenia patients with/without paranoid symptoms inclined to use hostile (P = 0.01, P = 0.02, respectively) and blaming (P = 0.01, P = 0.02, respectively) attributions compared with normal subjects. Moreover, patients with paranoid symptoms inclined to use more hostile and blaming attributions compared to patients without paranoid symptoms. Conclusions: Three variables of emotion perception, theory of mind, and hostile and blaming attributions were able to distinguish schizophrenia patients from healthy individuals, while only hostile and blaming attributions were able to distinguish patients with paranoid symptoms and those without paranoid symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number83575
JournalIranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Attributions
  • Paranoia
  • Schizophrenia
  • Theory of Mind

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparing multiple domains of social cognition in schizophrenic patients with vs. Without paranoid symptoms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this