Comparative assessment of hypercoagulability in women with and without gynecologic malignancies using the thromboelastograph coagulation analyzer

Mark J. Wehrum, Jeffrey F. Hines, Edwin B. Hayes, Edward R. Kost, Kevin L. Hall, Michael J. Paidas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypercoagulability status of women with and without gynecologic malignancies was compared using the thromboelastograph coagulation analyzer. Blood specimens from 25 women with newly diagnosed gynecologic malignancies and from 21 age-matched controls were analyzed. Hypercoagulability is defined by a short R value (min), a short K value (min), an elevated maximum amplitude (MA) value (mm), and a broad α-angle (°). A two-tailed, two-sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. When compared with specimens from age-matched controls, specimens from women with gynecologic malignancies demonstrated values consistent with hypercoagulability. The specific parameters are presented as a mean (± SD). Patients with gynecologic malignancies were found to have a short R value (7.1 ± 2.1 vs. 11.8 ± 1.8 min; P < 0.001), a short K value (3.1 ± 0.9 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 min; P < 0.001), a prolonged MA value (64.7 ± 5.4 vs. 58.8 ± 6.1 mm; P = 0.001), and a greater α-angle (70.6 ± 5.3 vs. 61.6 ± 4.9°; P < 0.001). Detection of hypercoagulability as measured by thromboelastography is statistically more common among women with gynecologic malignancies compared with age-matched controls. Future studies may address the use of thromboelastography to identify patients at risk for gynecologic malignancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-143
Number of pages4
JournalBlood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Gynecologic malignancies
  • Hypercoagulability
  • Thromboelastograph coagulation analyzer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparative assessment of hypercoagulability in women with and without gynecologic malignancies using the thromboelastograph coagulation analyzer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this