Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia Among Active Duty Military Personnel Diagnosed With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Tim Hoyt, Marquisha R.G. Lee, Jason D. Stolee, Joshua A. Breitstein, Herbert P. Kwon, Vincent Mysliwiec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are common conditions among military service members, with high rates of comorbidity. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been established as an effective treatment for insomnia, it is unclear whether or not CBT-I is effective among service members with comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea. Materials and Methods: This retrospective, observational study examined insomnia outcomes among a group of service member patients (N = 73) with comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea. All patients received individual CBT-I in a specialty sleep clinic at a military treatment facility. Seven outcomes associated with insomnia were evaluated before and after treatment. Results: On average, patients showed significant improvement in sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, and symptoms reported on the Insomnia Severity Index. Twenty-six percent of patients showed clinically significant improvement in reported insomnia symptoms. Conclusions: These results suggest that CBT-I may be effective in treating military service members with comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea. Despite the limitations of data collected in a clinical setting, consistent findings across five of the seven outcome measures provide good evidence that this treatment can be implemented in military settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2856-2861
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume188
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2023
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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