Clinical correlates of subsyndromal depression in African American individuals with psychosis: The relationship with positive symptoms and comorbid substance dependence

Emma E.M. Knowles, Samuel R. Mathias, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Jennifer Barrett, Josephine Mollon, Dominique Denbow, Katrina Aberzik, Molly Zatony, David C. Glahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with psychosis exhibit subsyndromal depressive symptoms during the course of illness and yet the clinical correlates of these symptoms remain under-investigated. We aimed to investigate the clinical correlates of subsyndromal depression in psychosis including the extent to which they mediate commonly observed comorbid substance dependence. We developed a model of depression in a non-clinical sample recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk (N = 266), and confirmed that model in a locally recruited African-American clinical sample comprising psychotic and non-psychotic individuals (N = 256). Using scores from this model we tested: the strength of relationships between depressive symptomatology and positive, negative and disorganized symptoms in a range of psychotic disorders; whether depressive symptoms were higher in individuals with affective psychoses versus schizophrenia; and if depressive symptomatology mediated the relationship between psychosis and substance dependence. Subsyndromal depressive symptomatology was significantly higher in individuals with psychosis than without psychosis, but did not significantly differ between affective and non-affective psychotic groups. Depressive symptomatology was significantly related to positive (but not negative or disorganized)psychotic symptoms, and mediated the relationship between psychosis and substance dependence. The present study underlines the importance of assessing subsyndromal depression in patients with psychosis, and generates a number of testable predictions for future work. In particular, the examination of the relationships between comorbid psychopathology, namely depression and substance abuse, may improve insight into the neurobiology of psychosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-346
Number of pages14
JournalSchizophrenia research
Volume206
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Crowd sourcing
  • Depression
  • Psychosis
  • Structural equation modeling
  • Substance Dependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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