Chronic stress and brain plasticity: Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders

Jason Radley, David A Morilak, Victor Viau, Serge Campeau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-91
Number of pages13
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume58
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Laboratory Animals
Neurosciences
Prosencephalon
Safety
Survival
Health
Brain

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Chronic stress
  • Gonadal hormones
  • Hippocampus
  • Plasticity
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Stress habituation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Chronic stress and brain plasticity : Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders. / Radley, Jason; Morilak, David A; Viau, Victor; Campeau, Serge.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 58, 01.11.2015, p. 79-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b1c9096e8ef746829019fccf8ebee440,
title = "Chronic stress and brain plasticity: Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders",
abstract = "Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans.",
keywords = "Amygdala, Chronic stress, Gonadal hormones, Hippocampus, Plasticity, Prefrontal cortex, Stress habituation",
author = "Jason Radley and Morilak, {David A} and Victor Viau and Serge Campeau",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.06.018",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "79--91",
journal = "Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews",
issn = "0149-7634",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic stress and brain plasticity

T2 - Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders

AU - Radley, Jason

AU - Morilak, David A

AU - Viau, Victor

AU - Campeau, Serge

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans.

AB - Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans.

KW - Amygdala

KW - Chronic stress

KW - Gonadal hormones

KW - Hippocampus

KW - Plasticity

KW - Prefrontal cortex

KW - Stress habituation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940423321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940423321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.06.018

DO - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.06.018

M3 - Article

C2 - 26116544

AN - SCOPUS:84940423321

VL - 58

SP - 79

EP - 91

JO - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

JF - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

SN - 0149-7634

ER -