Chromosome damage and micronucleus formation in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to radiofrequency radiation at a cellular telephone frequency (847.74 MHz, CDMA)

Vijayalaxmi, K. S. Bisht, W. F. Pickard, M. L. Meltz, J. L. Roti Roti, E. G. Moros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peripheral blood samples collected from four healthy nonsmoking human volunteers were diluted with tissue culture medium and exposed in vitro for 24 h to 847.74 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation (continuous wave), a frequency employed for cellular telephone communications. A code division multiple access (CDMA) technology was used with a nominal net forward power of 75 W and a nominal power density of 950 W/m2 (95 mW/cm2). The mean specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.9 or 5.5 W/kg. Blood aliquots that were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy of γ radiation were included in the study as controls. The temperatures of the medium during RF-radiation and sham exposures in the Radial Transmission Line facility were controlled at 37 ± 0.3°C. Immediately after the exposures, lymphocytes were cultured at 37 ± 1°C for 48 or 72 h. The extent of genetic damage was assessed from the incidence of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei. The kinetics of cell proliferation was determined from the mitotic indices in 48-h cultures and from the incidence of binucleate cells in 72-h cultures. The data indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to mitotic indices, frequencies of exchange aberrations, excess fragments, binucleate cells, and micronuclei. The response of γ-irradiated lymphocytes was significantly different from that of both RF-radiation-exposed and sham-exposed cells for all of these indices. Thus there was no evidence for induction of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro for 24 h to 847.74 MHz RF radiation (CDMA) at SARs of 4.9 or 5.5 W/kg.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-432
Number of pages3
JournalRadiation Research
Volume156
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 9 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiation
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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