Chromium Picolinate (CrP) a putative anti-obesity nutrient induces changes in body composition as a function of the Taq1 dopamine D2 receptor polymorphisms in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled study

Thomas J.H. Chen, Kenneth Blum, Gilbert Kaats, Eric R. Braverman, Arthur Eisenberg, Mark Sherman, Katharine Davis, David E. Comings, Robert Wood, Dennis Pullin, Vanessa Arcuri, Michael Varshavski, Julie F. Mengucci, Seth H. Blum, Bernard W. Downs, Brian Meshkin, Roger L. Waite, Lonna Williams, John Schoolfield, Thomas J. PrihodaLisa White

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12 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is controversy regarding the effects and safety of chromium salts (picolinate and nicotinate) on body composition and weight loss in humans. Thus, we decided to test the hypothesis that typing the obese patients by genotyping the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene prior to treatment with Chromium Picolinate (CrP) would result in a differential treatment outcome. We genotyped obese subjects for the DRD2 gene utilizing standard PCR techniques. The subjects were assessed for scale weight and for percent body fat using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXAR). The subjects were divided into matched placebo and CrP groups (400 μg. per day) accordingly. The sample was separated into two independent groups. Those with either an A1/A1 or A1/A2 allele or those with only the A2/A2 allelic pattern. Each of these groups were tested separately for differences between placebo and treatment means for a variety of measures of weight change. The measures of the change in fat weight (p<0.041), change in body weight (p<0.017), the percent change in weight (p<0.044), and the body weight change in kilograms (p<0.012) were all significant for carriers of the DRD2 A2 genotype, whereas no significance was found for any parameter for those subjects possessing a DRD2 A1 allele. These results suggest that the dopaminergic system, specifically the density of the D2 receptors, confers a significant differential therapeutic effect of CrP in terms of weight loss and change in body fat, thereby strengthening the need for DNA testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalGene Therapy and Molecular Biology
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Keywords

  • And dopamine D2 receptor gene
  • Body-composition
  • Chromium Picolinate
  • Genotrim®
  • Genotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Chen, T. J. H., Blum, K., Kaats, G., Braverman, E. R., Eisenberg, A., Sherman, M., Davis, K., Comings, D. E., Wood, R., Pullin, D., Arcuri, V., Varshavski, M., Mengucci, J. F., Blum, S. H., Downs, B. W., Meshkin, B., Waite, R. L., Williams, L., Schoolfield, J., ... White, L. (2007). Chromium Picolinate (CrP) a putative anti-obesity nutrient induces changes in body composition as a function of the Taq1 dopamine D2 receptor polymorphisms in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled study. Gene Therapy and Molecular Biology, 11(2), 161-170.