Childhood Abuse, the Interpersonal–Psychological Theory of Suicide, and the Mediating Role of Depression

Noelle B. Smith, Lindsey L. Monteith, David C. Rozek, Alicia E. Meuret

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although childhood abuse is a well-known risk factor for suicide, no studies have investigated the role of interpersonal–psychological (Joiner, 2005), constructs in this association. This study examined whether childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse were associated with IPTS constructs, and whether depressive symptoms mediated these associations. Ninety-one participants completed self-report measures. Emotional abuse predicted perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, and depressive symptoms mediated these associations. Physical abuse predicted the acquired capability for suicide, although depression did not mediate this association. These findings suggest that specific types of abuse differentially predict IPTS components and underscore depression as a potential mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-569
Number of pages11
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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