Child sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators

Nancy D Kellogg, Thomas J. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe feelings, disclosure characteristics, family dysfunction, and health risky behaviors in those adolescents having unwanted sexual experiences (USE; any kind of sexual touching that was bad, uncomfortable, or forced) with multiple perpetrators and to compare these parameters with those adolescents having USE(s) with single perpetrators. Method: A cross-sectional survey of consecutive waiting room patients from four clinic sites was done in 538 adolescents and young adults; 76% of the study population were Hispanic and over half were poor. One hundred sixty-one subjects with single perpetrator USE(s) were compared with 97 subjects who had USE(s) with more than one perpetrator. Results: Victims of multiple perpetrators were more likely than victims of single perpetrators to react with self-blame and delay disclosure of USE due to shame. When compared with victims of single perpetrators, those with multiple perpetrators were more likely to disclose their USE to protect self or others or because they became weary or intolerant of the abuse. Although family violence and substance abuse were common in both victims of single and multiple perpetrators of USE, these factors appeared to potentiate the likelihood of repeated victimization in childhood. Prevalence of health risky behaviors did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The findings indicated that sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators is not uncommon and suggest that abused children should be questioned about this possibility. Children and teenagers who have USE(s) with more than one perpetrator may have more difficulties with psychological recovery due to increased shame and self-blame.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-964
Number of pages12
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997

Fingerprint

Shame
Disclosure
shame
adolescent
health behavior
Patients' Rooms
Domestic Violence
Crime Victims
Family Health
Hispanic Americans
victimization
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
young adult
Young Adult
Emotions
abuse
Cross-Sectional Studies
childhood
violence

Keywords

  • Child sexual abuse
  • Multiple perpetrators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law
  • Education
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Child sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators. / Kellogg, Nancy D; Hoffman, Thomas J.

In: Child Abuse and Neglect, Vol. 21, No. 10, 10.1997, p. 953-964.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kellogg, Nancy D ; Hoffman, Thomas J. / Child sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators. In: Child Abuse and Neglect. 1997 ; Vol. 21, No. 10. pp. 953-964.
@article{f1ad1ecd3bae406da258543919bb7049,
title = "Child sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators",
abstract = "Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe feelings, disclosure characteristics, family dysfunction, and health risky behaviors in those adolescents having unwanted sexual experiences (USE; any kind of sexual touching that was bad, uncomfortable, or forced) with multiple perpetrators and to compare these parameters with those adolescents having USE(s) with single perpetrators. Method: A cross-sectional survey of consecutive waiting room patients from four clinic sites was done in 538 adolescents and young adults; 76{\%} of the study population were Hispanic and over half were poor. One hundred sixty-one subjects with single perpetrator USE(s) were compared with 97 subjects who had USE(s) with more than one perpetrator. Results: Victims of multiple perpetrators were more likely than victims of single perpetrators to react with self-blame and delay disclosure of USE due to shame. When compared with victims of single perpetrators, those with multiple perpetrators were more likely to disclose their USE to protect self or others or because they became weary or intolerant of the abuse. Although family violence and substance abuse were common in both victims of single and multiple perpetrators of USE, these factors appeared to potentiate the likelihood of repeated victimization in childhood. Prevalence of health risky behaviors did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The findings indicated that sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators is not uncommon and suggest that abused children should be questioned about this possibility. Children and teenagers who have USE(s) with more than one perpetrator may have more difficulties with psychological recovery due to increased shame and self-blame.",
keywords = "Child sexual abuse, Multiple perpetrators",
author = "Kellogg, {Nancy D} and Hoffman, {Thomas J.}",
year = "1997",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/S0145-2134(97)00056-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "953--964",
journal = "Child Abuse and Neglect",
issn = "0145-2134",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Child sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators

AU - Kellogg, Nancy D

AU - Hoffman, Thomas J.

PY - 1997/10

Y1 - 1997/10

N2 - Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe feelings, disclosure characteristics, family dysfunction, and health risky behaviors in those adolescents having unwanted sexual experiences (USE; any kind of sexual touching that was bad, uncomfortable, or forced) with multiple perpetrators and to compare these parameters with those adolescents having USE(s) with single perpetrators. Method: A cross-sectional survey of consecutive waiting room patients from four clinic sites was done in 538 adolescents and young adults; 76% of the study population were Hispanic and over half were poor. One hundred sixty-one subjects with single perpetrator USE(s) were compared with 97 subjects who had USE(s) with more than one perpetrator. Results: Victims of multiple perpetrators were more likely than victims of single perpetrators to react with self-blame and delay disclosure of USE due to shame. When compared with victims of single perpetrators, those with multiple perpetrators were more likely to disclose their USE to protect self or others or because they became weary or intolerant of the abuse. Although family violence and substance abuse were common in both victims of single and multiple perpetrators of USE, these factors appeared to potentiate the likelihood of repeated victimization in childhood. Prevalence of health risky behaviors did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The findings indicated that sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators is not uncommon and suggest that abused children should be questioned about this possibility. Children and teenagers who have USE(s) with more than one perpetrator may have more difficulties with psychological recovery due to increased shame and self-blame.

AB - Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe feelings, disclosure characteristics, family dysfunction, and health risky behaviors in those adolescents having unwanted sexual experiences (USE; any kind of sexual touching that was bad, uncomfortable, or forced) with multiple perpetrators and to compare these parameters with those adolescents having USE(s) with single perpetrators. Method: A cross-sectional survey of consecutive waiting room patients from four clinic sites was done in 538 adolescents and young adults; 76% of the study population were Hispanic and over half were poor. One hundred sixty-one subjects with single perpetrator USE(s) were compared with 97 subjects who had USE(s) with more than one perpetrator. Results: Victims of multiple perpetrators were more likely than victims of single perpetrators to react with self-blame and delay disclosure of USE due to shame. When compared with victims of single perpetrators, those with multiple perpetrators were more likely to disclose their USE to protect self or others or because they became weary or intolerant of the abuse. Although family violence and substance abuse were common in both victims of single and multiple perpetrators of USE, these factors appeared to potentiate the likelihood of repeated victimization in childhood. Prevalence of health risky behaviors did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions: The findings indicated that sexual revictimization by multiple perpetrators is not uncommon and suggest that abused children should be questioned about this possibility. Children and teenagers who have USE(s) with more than one perpetrator may have more difficulties with psychological recovery due to increased shame and self-blame.

KW - Child sexual abuse

KW - Multiple perpetrators

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030828324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030828324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0145-2134(97)00056-2

DO - 10.1016/S0145-2134(97)00056-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 9330796

AN - SCOPUS:0030828324

VL - 21

SP - 953

EP - 964

JO - Child Abuse and Neglect

JF - Child Abuse and Neglect

SN - 0145-2134

IS - 10

ER -