Child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation: Health care needs of victims

Jordan Greenbaum, James E. Crawford-Jakubiak, Cindy W. Christian, Emalee G. Flaherty, John M. Leventhal, James L. Lukefahr, Robert D. Sege, Harriet MacMillan, Catherine M. Nolan, Linda Anne Valley, Tammy Piazza Hurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) are major public health problems in the United States and throughout the world. Despite large numbers of American and foreign youth affected and a plethora of serious physical and mental health problems associated with CSEC, there is limited information available to pediatricians regarding the nature and scope of human trafficking and how pediatricians and other health care providers may help protect children. Knowledge of risk factors, recruitment practices, possible indicators of CSEC, and common medical and behavioral health problems experienced by victims will help pediatricians recognize potential victims and respond appropriately. As health care providers, educators, and leaders in child advocacy, pediatricians play an essential role in addressing the public health issues faced by child victims of CSEC. Their roles can include working to increase recognition of CSEC, providing direct care and anticipatory guidance related to CSEC, engaging in collaborative efforts with medical and nonmedical colleagues to provide for the complex needs of youth, and educating child-serving professionals and the public.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)566-574
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume135
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Greenbaum, J., Crawford-Jakubiak, J. E., Christian, C. W., Flaherty, E. G., Leventhal, J. M., Lukefahr, J. L., Sege, R. D., MacMillan, H., Nolan, C. M., Valley, L. A., & Hurley, T. P. (2015). Child sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation: Health care needs of victims. Pediatrics, 135(3), 566-574. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-4138