Characterizing relapse prevention in bipolar disorder with adjunctive ziprasidone

Clinical and methodological implications

Charles L. Bowden, Onur N. Karayal, Jeffrey H. Schwartz, Balarama K. Gundapaneni, Cedric O'Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ziprasidone, adjunctive to either lithium or valproate, has previously been shown to be associated with a significantly lower risk of relapse in bipolar disorder compared with lithium or valproate treatment alone. Methods: This placebo-controlled outpatient trial with ziprasidone adjunctive to lithium or valproate or lithium and valproate alone, for subjects with a recent or current manic or mixed episode of bipolar I disorder, comprised a 2.5- to 4-month, open-label stabilization period, followed by a 6-month, double-blind maintenance period. These post hoc analyses characterize the relapse outcomes by dose, relapse types and timing as well as all-reason discontinuations during the maintenance period. Results: Time to relapse and all-reason discontinuation were both statistically significant in favor of the ziprasidone 120 mg/day group compared with placebo (p=0.004 and 0.001, respectively) during the 6-month double-blind period. There was no difference in time to relapse in the 80 and 160 mg/day dose groups compared with placebo (p=0.16 and 0.40, respectively) and, likewise, for time to all-reason discontinuation (p=0.20 for both doses). The majority of relapses in each group occurred prior to week 8, and most were depressive in nature. Limitations: The primary study was not designed to compare relapse rates by dose groups. Conclusions: These analyses confirm the effectiveness of ziprasidone (80-160 mg/day) in preventing relapses in subjects with bipolar disorder, with the 120 mg/day dosage appearing to have the highest relapse prevention rate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-175
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume144
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2013

Fingerprint

Secondary Prevention
Bipolar Disorder
Recurrence
Valproic Acid
Lithium
Placebos
Maintenance
ziprasidone
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Bipolar disease
  • Relapse prevention
  • Ziprasidone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Characterizing relapse prevention in bipolar disorder with adjunctive ziprasidone : Clinical and methodological implications. / Bowden, Charles L.; Karayal, Onur N.; Schwartz, Jeffrey H.; Gundapaneni, Balarama K.; O'Gorman, Cedric.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 144, No. 1-2, 10.01.2013, p. 171-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bowden, Charles L. ; Karayal, Onur N. ; Schwartz, Jeffrey H. ; Gundapaneni, Balarama K. ; O'Gorman, Cedric. / Characterizing relapse prevention in bipolar disorder with adjunctive ziprasidone : Clinical and methodological implications. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2013 ; Vol. 144, No. 1-2. pp. 171-175.
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