Characterization of complex, co-adapted skeletal biomechanics phenotypes: A needed paradigm shift in the genetics of bone structure and function

L. M. Havill, H. B. Coan, M. C. Mahaney, D. P. Nicolella

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    2 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The genetic architecture of skeletal biomechanical performance has tremendous potential to advance our knowledge of the biological mechanisms that drive variation in skeletal fragility and osteoporosis risk. Research using traditional approaches that focus on specific gene pathways is increasing our understanding of how and to what degree those pathways may affect population-level variation in fracture susceptibility, and shows that known pathways may affect bone fragility through unsuspected mechanisms. Non-traditional approaches that incorporate a new appreciation for the degree to which bone traits co-adapt to functional loading environments, using a wide variety of redundant compensatory mechanisms to meet both physiological and mechanical demands, represent a radical departure from the dominant reductionist paradigm and have the potential to rapidly advance our understanding of bone fragility and identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)174-180
    Number of pages7
    JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2014

    Keywords

    • Baboon
    • Biomechanics
    • Bone
    • Bone fragility
    • Bone mineral density
    • Bone quality
    • Co-adaptation
    • Compensatory signaling
    • Composite traits
    • Fracture resistance
    • Fracture risk
    • Gene pathways
    • Genetics
    • High-risk phenotypes
    • Mechanical load
    • Nonhuman primate
    • Osteoporosis
    • Papio
    • Phenotypic integration
    • Phenotypic variation
    • Skeletal genetics
    • Structural integrity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Characterization of complex, co-adapted skeletal biomechanics phenotypes: A needed paradigm shift in the genetics of bone structure and function'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this