Changing needs of community-acquired pneumonia

Julio Alberto Ramirez, Antonio R Anzueto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a serious condition associated with significant morbidity and potential long-term mortality. Although the majority of patients with CAP are treated as outpatients, the greatest proportion of pneumonia-related mortality and healthcare expenditure occurs among the patients who are hospitalized. There has been considerable interest in determining risk factors and severity criteria assessments to assist with site-of-care decisions. For both inpatients and outpatients, the most common pathogens associated with CAP include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, group A streptococci and Moraxella catarrhalis. Atypical pathogens, Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and viruses are also recognized aetiological agents of CAP. Despite the availability of antimicrobial therapies, the recent emergence of drug-resistant pneumococcal and staphylococcal isolates has limited the effectiveness of currently available agents. Because early and rapid initiation of empirical antimicrobial treatment is critical for achieving a favourable outcome in CAP, newer agents with activity against drug-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae and MRSA are needed for the management of patients with CAP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberdkr094
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume66
Issue numberSUPPL.3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Pneumonia
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Outpatients
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Mortality
Haemophilus influenzae
Health Expenditures
Streptococcus
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Bacillus
Inpatients
Viruses
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial therapy
  • Clinical outcomes
  • PSI/CURB-65 score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Changing needs of community-acquired pneumonia. / Ramirez, Julio Alberto; Anzueto, Antonio R.

In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Vol. 66, No. SUPPL.3, dkr094, 04.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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