Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin levels in 159 neurologically asymptomatic persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1): Relationship to immune status

D. R. Lucey, S. A. McGuire, S. Abbadessa, K. Hall, B. Woolford, S. Valtier, C. A. Butzin, G. P. Melcher, C. W. Hendrix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monocytes and brain macrophage-microglial cells are thought to play a crucial role in the neurologic dysfunction associated with HIV-1 disease. Since neopterin is produced by monocytes-macrophages, we asked whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neopterin levels increase before the onset of HIV-1 neurologic disease and whether they correlate with other CSF and peripheral blood immunologic parameters. In this study, CSF neopterin levels from 159 neurologically asymptomatic HIV-positive persons were found to increase as the blood CD4+ T-cell count decreased and as CSF IgG, IgG synthesis, IgG index, and β2-microglobulin increased. Neopterin levels in the CSF exceeded those in the serum in 32% of patients, while 25% had (CSF levels >13.5 nmol/liter. CSF neopterin levels vary with immune status, may reflect intrathecal production, and can be elevated in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients with normal neurologic examinations. Long-term follow-up of this patient population should be able to define the clinical correlation between CSF neopterin levels during the asymptomatic phase of HIV-1 disease and the risk of subsequent neurologic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-272
Number of pages6
JournalViral Immunology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Virology

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