Cerebral and cerebellar volume loss in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus: A review of clinically acquired brain magnetic resonance imaging

Eyal Muscal, Elfrides Traipe, Mariettam De Guzman, Barry L. Myones, Robin L Brey, Jill V. Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Cerebral atrophy is a prominent feature in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We assessed cerebral and cerebellar volume loss on clinically acquired brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of children and adolescents with SLE. Methods. We abstracted information on disease course for patients who underwent clinical brain MRI during the period 2002-2008. We completed qualitative assessments of volume loss and measured corpus callosum thickness and ventricular enlargement for patients with lupus and controls. Results. Forty-nine children underwent brain MRI during the review period due to clinical indications. The lupus cohort was predominantly female and ethnically diverse. Mean age at imaging was 15.3 ± 2.6 years and mean disease duration was 30.6 ± 33.3 months. Findings suggestive of cerebral and cerebellar volume loss were seen respectively in 89.8% and 91.8% of lupus patients. Cerebral volume loss was moderate or severe in 26.5% of children. Cerebellar volume loss was moderate in 20.4% of these patients. Linear measurement means reflected corpus callosum thinning and ventricular enlargement in lupus patients. Volume loss was observed in newly diagnosed patients prior to corticosteroid use. Disease duration and corticosteroid use did not predict the severity of volume loss. There were statistically significant differences in linear imaging measurements comparing lupus patients to 14 similar-age controls. Conclusion. Regional volume loss was observed in most adolescents with lupus undergoing clinical brain MRI scans. As in other pediatric conditions with inflammatory or vascular etiologies, these findings may be reflecting disease-associated neuronal loss and not solely the effects of corticosteroid. The Journal of Rheumatology

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1768-1775
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Corpus Callosum
Rheumatology
Atrophy
Blood Vessels
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Cerebral atrophy
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Neuropsychiatric lupus
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Cerebral and cerebellar volume loss in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus : A review of clinically acquired brain magnetic resonance imaging. / Muscal, Eyal; Traipe, Elfrides; De Guzman, Mariettam; Myones, Barry L.; Brey, Robin L; Hunter, Jill V.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 37, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 1768-1775.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muscal, Eyal ; Traipe, Elfrides ; De Guzman, Mariettam ; Myones, Barry L. ; Brey, Robin L ; Hunter, Jill V. / Cerebral and cerebellar volume loss in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus : A review of clinically acquired brain magnetic resonance imaging. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 1768-1775.
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N2 - Objective. Cerebral atrophy is a prominent feature in adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We assessed cerebral and cerebellar volume loss on clinically acquired brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of children and adolescents with SLE. Methods. We abstracted information on disease course for patients who underwent clinical brain MRI during the period 2002-2008. We completed qualitative assessments of volume loss and measured corpus callosum thickness and ventricular enlargement for patients with lupus and controls. Results. Forty-nine children underwent brain MRI during the review period due to clinical indications. The lupus cohort was predominantly female and ethnically diverse. Mean age at imaging was 15.3 ± 2.6 years and mean disease duration was 30.6 ± 33.3 months. Findings suggestive of cerebral and cerebellar volume loss were seen respectively in 89.8% and 91.8% of lupus patients. Cerebral volume loss was moderate or severe in 26.5% of children. Cerebellar volume loss was moderate in 20.4% of these patients. Linear measurement means reflected corpus callosum thinning and ventricular enlargement in lupus patients. Volume loss was observed in newly diagnosed patients prior to corticosteroid use. Disease duration and corticosteroid use did not predict the severity of volume loss. There were statistically significant differences in linear imaging measurements comparing lupus patients to 14 similar-age controls. Conclusion. Regional volume loss was observed in most adolescents with lupus undergoing clinical brain MRI scans. As in other pediatric conditions with inflammatory or vascular etiologies, these findings may be reflecting disease-associated neuronal loss and not solely the effects of corticosteroid. The Journal of Rheumatology

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