Cerebellar development in a baboon model of preterm delivery: Impact of specific ventilatory regimes

Sandra M. Rees, Michelle M. Loeliger, Kathryn M. Munro, Amy Shields, Penelope A. Dalitz, Sandra Dieni, Merran A. Thomson, Jacqueline Coalson, Terrie Inder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Premature infants now have an improved chance of survival, but the impact of respiratory therapies on the brain, particularly the cerebellum, remains unclear. We examined the effects of early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (EnCPAP) ventilation and delayed (Dn) CPAP on the development of the cerebellum in prematurely delivered baboons. The baboons were delivered at 125 ± 2days of gestation and ventilated for 28 days with either EnCPAP commencing at 24 hours (n = 5) or DnCPAP commencing at 5 days (n = 5). Gestational controls (n = 4) were delivered at 153 days. Cerebella were assessed histologically, and an ontogeny study (90 days to term) was performed to establish values for key cerebellar developmental indicators. Cerebellar weight was reduced in DnCPAP but not EnCPAP animals versus controls; cerebellar/total brain weight ratio was increased in EnCPAP (p < 0.05) versus control and DnCPAP animals. There was no overt damage in the cerebella of any animals, but a microstructural alteration index based on morphological developmental parameters and microglial immunoreactivity was increased in both prematurely delivered cohorts versus controls (p < 0.001) and was higher in DnCPAP than EnCPAP animals (p < 0.05). These results indicate that respiratory regimens can influence cerebellar development and that early compared with delayed extubation to nCPAP seems to be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-615
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Cerebellar ontogeny
  • Nasal continuous positive airway pressure
  • Neuropathology
  • Nonhuman primate
  • Prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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