Cellular senescence and tissue aging in vivo

Peter J Hornsby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A long-standing controversy concerns the relevance of cellular senescence, defined and observed as a cell culture phenomenon, to tissue aging in vivo. Here the evidence on this topic is reviewed. The main conclusions are as follows. First, telomere shortening, the principal known mediator of cellular senescence, occurs in many human tissues in aging. Second, it is not clear whether this results in cellular senescence or in some other cell fate (e.g., crisis). Third, rodents probably are not appropriate experimental models for these questions, because of important differences in telomere biology between rodent cells and cells from long-lived mammals (e.g., human or bovine cells). Fourth, better and more comprehensive observations on aging human tissues are needed to answer the question of the occurrence of senescent cells in tissues, and new experimental approaches are needed to elucidate the consequences of telomere shortening in tissues in aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume57
Issue number7
StatePublished - 2002

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Cell Aging
Telomere Shortening
Rodentia
Telomere
Mammals
Theoretical Models
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

Cellular senescence and tissue aging in vivo. / Hornsby, Peter J.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 57, No. 7, 2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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