Cellular immunity in depressed, conduct disorder, and normal adolescents: Role of adverse life events

B. Birmaher, B. S. Rabin, M. R. Garcia, U. Jain, T. L. Whiteside, D. E. Williamson, M. Al-Shabbout, B. C. Nelson, R. E. Dahl, N. D. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether adolescents with major depressive disorder have disturbances in their cellular immunity and to study whether the immunological changes detected are specific to depression or are general responses to stress. Method: Twenty subjects with major depressive disorder, 17 nondepressed subjects with conduct disorder, and 17 normal adolescents were recruited. Subjects were assessed with a clinical interview for DSM- III-R and a modified version of the Coddington Life Events Checklist. Blood samples were drawn for total white blood cells, lymphocytes subsets, natural killer cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation response to phytohemagglutinin, and cortisol plasma levels. Results: Overall, there were no significant between-group differences in any of the cellular immune measurements. Natural killer cell activity was significantly negatively correlated with past year and lifetime adverse life events across all effector-target cell ratios. Controlling for diagnoses and socioeconomic status yielded similar results. There were no significant effects of age, sex, race, sleep, nutrition, cigarette use, menstrual cycle, or cortisol on any of the immunological variables. Conclusions: In this sample of adolescents, we found that independent of the diagnoses and socioeconomic status, increases in adverse life events were associated with low natural killer cell activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-678
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Conduct Disorder
Cellular Immunity
Natural Killer Cells
Major Depressive Disorder
Social Class
Hydrocortisone
Lymphocyte Subsets
Phytohemagglutinins
Menstrual Cycle
Checklist
Tobacco Products
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Sleep
Leukocytes
Lymphocytes
Interviews
Depression

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • adverse life events
  • conduct disorder
  • immunity
  • major depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Cellular immunity in depressed, conduct disorder, and normal adolescents : Role of adverse life events. / Birmaher, B.; Rabin, B. S.; Garcia, M. R.; Jain, U.; Whiteside, T. L.; Williamson, D. E.; Al-Shabbout, M.; Nelson, B. C.; Dahl, R. E.; Ryan, N. D.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 33, No. 5, 1994, p. 671-678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Birmaher, B, Rabin, BS, Garcia, MR, Jain, U, Whiteside, TL, Williamson, DE, Al-Shabbout, M, Nelson, BC, Dahl, RE & Ryan, ND 1994, 'Cellular immunity in depressed, conduct disorder, and normal adolescents: Role of adverse life events', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 671-678. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004583-199406000-00008
Birmaher, B. ; Rabin, B. S. ; Garcia, M. R. ; Jain, U. ; Whiteside, T. L. ; Williamson, D. E. ; Al-Shabbout, M. ; Nelson, B. C. ; Dahl, R. E. ; Ryan, N. D. / Cellular immunity in depressed, conduct disorder, and normal adolescents : Role of adverse life events. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1994 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 671-678.
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