Cardiovascular Effects of Nicotine, Chlorisondamine, and Mecamylamine in the Pigeon

Kathryn K. Chadman, James H. Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chlorisondamine and mecamylamine are nicotinic antagonists that produce both ganglionic and central blockade. Chlorisondamine, when administered as a large systemic dose, produces a persistent central block, despite being charged. The present study evaluated the cardiovascular effects of chlorisondamine. Shortly after administration, chlorisondamine (0.10, 1, and 10 mg/kg i.m.) lowered blood pressure significantly and decreased heart rate at the low dose (0.1 mg/kg i.m.) and increased heart rate at the high dose (10 mg/kg i.m.). Mecamylamine (1 and 10 mg/kg i.m.) also lowered blood pressure and heart rate. After both antagonists, heart rate returned to baseline values within 90 min and blood pressure within 24 h. Low doses of nicotine (0.01-0.03 mg/kg i.m.) lowered blood pressure but did not affect heart rate. Higher doses (0.10-3.2 mg/kg i.m.) transiently increased blood pressure and heart rate. Subsequent to antagonist administration, nicotine was administered to determine whether either drug blocked the cardiovascular effects of nicotine. Chlorisondamine (0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg i.m.) administered 30 min before nicotine blocked the increases in blood pressure and heart rate. Only the high dose (10 mg/kg i.m.) of chlorisondamine administered 24 h before nicotine produced a blockade of nicotine's pressor effect. This block diminished within 3 days. Mecamylamine (1 mg/kg i.m.) antagonized only nicotine's tachycardic effect. Longer pretreatment with mecamylamine (10 mg/kg, 24 h before nicotine challenge) did not antagonize the cardiovascular effects of nicotine. Thus, chlorisondamine produces a longer lasting blockade of nicotine's cardiovascular effects than mecamylamine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-78
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume308
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

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