Bunch length measurements using coherent radiation

Rasmus Ischebeck, Christopher Barnes, Ian Blumenfeld, Franz Josef Decker, Mark Hogan, Richard H. Iverson, Patrick Krejcik, Robert H. Siemann, Dieter Walz, Neil Kirby, Chris Clayton, Chengkun Huang, Devon K. Johnson, Wei Lu, Ken Marsh, Suzhi Deng, Erdem Oz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The accelerating field that can be obtained in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator depends on the current of the electron beam that excites the wake. In the E-167 experiment, a peak current above 10kA will be delivered at a particle energy of 28 GeV. The bunch has a length of a few ten micrometers and several methods are used to measure its longitudinal profile. Among these, autocorrelation of coherent transition radiation (CTR) is employed. The beam passes a thin metallic foil, where it emits transition radiation. For wavelengths greater than the bunch length, this transition radiation is emitted coherently. This amplifies the long-wavelength part of the spectrum. A scanning Michelson interferometer is used to autocorrelate the CTR. However, this method requires the contribution of many bunches to build an autocorrelation trace. The measurement is influenced by the transmission characteristics of the vacuum window and beam splitter. We present here an analysis of materials, as well as possible layouts for a single shot CTR autocorrelator.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC 2005
Pages4027-4029
Number of pages3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
EventParticle Accelerator Conference, PAC 2005 - Knoxville, TN, United States
Duration: May 16 2005May 20 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference
Volume2005

Other

OtherParticle Accelerator Conference, PAC 2005
CountryUnited States
CityKnoxville, TN
Period5/16/055/20/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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