Brain and lungs at risk after cervical spinal cord transection: Intracranial pressure, brain water, blood-brain barrier permeability, cerebral blood flow, and extravascular lung water changes

Maurice S. Albin, Leonid Bunegin, Steven Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The early physiopathologic responses to transection of the cervical spinal cord (C-4) were studied in the experimental animal. After transection, increases were seen in the mean arterial pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, intracranial pressure, brain water, blood-brain barrier permeability, and extravascular lung water with a marked decrease occurring in cerebral blood flow. Pretreatment with an α-adrenergic blocker, phentolamine (Regitine Ciba-Geigy Corp.), followed by transection blocked the rise in mean arterial blood pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure but did not affect the increases in intracranial pressure, brain water, blood-brain barrier permeability, and extravascular lung water and decreases in cerebral blood flow. Transection of the cervical spinal cord initiates a complex series of events involving intracranial compliance and pulmonary permeability, placing both brain and lungs at risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-205
Number of pages15
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1985

Keywords

  • Blood-brain barrier permeability
  • Brain water
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Extravascular lung water
  • Intracranial pressure
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Spinal cord transection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Brain and lungs at risk after cervical spinal cord transection: Intracranial pressure, brain water, blood-brain barrier permeability, cerebral blood flow, and extravascular lung water changes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this