Boutiques, Botox®, and basal cells: Can dermatology set its priorities?

Jeffrey J. Meffert, Maria Villegas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The public perception, now confirmed in the scientific literature, that it is easier and faster to get an appointment for cosmetic botulinum toxin injection than one to evaluate a possible melanoma poses a challenge to the specialty of dermatology. Addressing this disparity will require significant changes in the attitudes and priorities of many dermatologists; additionally, changes in the financing of graduate medical education may also be required. The demand for dermatological advice and treatment far outstrips specialist availability and will do so indefinitely. Primary care physicians and physician extenders will continue to deliver dermatologic care. Dermatologists are duty-bound to ensure that those providing this care are as well trained as possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDermatoethics
Subtitle of host publicationContemporary Ethics and Professionalism in Dermatology
PublisherSpringer-Verlag London Ltd
Pages131-136
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781447121916
ISBN (Print)9781447121909
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Meffert, J. J., & Villegas, M. (2012). Boutiques, Botox®, and basal cells: Can dermatology set its priorities? In Dermatoethics: Contemporary Ethics and Professionalism in Dermatology (pp. 131-136). Springer-Verlag London Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-2191-6_22