Body image and tobacco cessation: Relationships with weight concerns and intention to resume tobacco use

Anne C. Dobmeyer, Alan L. Peterson, Christine R. Runyan, Christine M. Hunter, Lisa R. Blackman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concern about weight gain after tobacco cessation is a potential barrier to quitting tobacco. Few studies, however, have examined the role of body image in cessation-related weight concerns and anticipated relapse. This study investigated relationships between current body image dissatisfaction, anticipated body image dissatisfaction (discrepancy between anticipated post-cessation body shape and desired body shape), cessation-related weight concerns, and intention to resume tobacco with weight gain. Body image dissatisfaction was significantly related to cessation-related weight concerns. Participants who reported current dissatisfaction with their body image were 2.6 times more likely to intend to resume tobacco use with cessation-related weight gain than those with no body image dissatisfaction. Individuals with anticipated body image dissatisfaction were 3.4 times more likely to intend to resume tobacco compared to individuals with no anticipated body image dissatisfaction. Women and normal weight individuals with anticipated body image dissatisfaction appear to be at particularly high risk for intending to relapse. Results suggest that tobacco cessation interventions may need to target concerns about body image as well as weight gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalBody Image
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Gender differences
  • Military
  • Relapse prevention
  • Smoking cessation
  • Weight concern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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