Basic and clinical investigations of dietary calcium in the prevention of colorectal cancer

Michael J. Wargovich, Allan R. Baer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Long-standing investigations into the role of diet in colon cancer have generally supported the notion that some aspect of dietary fats acts to promote cancer at this site. Understanding of the chemical behavior of lipids in the colon led to a hypothesis suggesting that depletion of calcium could partly explain the tumor-promoting effects of dietary fat. Calcium levels may control critical intracellular events in the course of proliferation. Lack of availability or loss of calcium may result in abnormalities in the regulation of colonic proliferation. Basic and clinical studies suggest that calcium supplementation reduces colonic proliferation implying a potential reduction in cancer risk. The current evidence supporting calcium as a cancer chemoprevention agent is reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-679
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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