Balloon-occlusion catheter rupture during balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices utilizing sodium tetradecyl sulfate: Incidence and consequences

Wael E.A. Saad, David Nicholson, Allison Lippert, Cynthia Wagner, Cenk U. Turba, Saher S. Sabri, Mark G. Davies, Alan H. Matsumoto, John Angle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) is an established procedure for the management of bleeding gastric varices in Asia. Invariably, the sclerosant utilized in Asia is ethanolamine oleate and the inventory used (vascular sheaths, balloon-occlusion catheters, and microcatheters) is not available outside Asia. A total of 41 BRTO procedures were performed with a technical and obliterative (gastric varix obliteration) success rate of 95% (n = 39 of 41) and 85% (n = 35 of 41), respectively. Complications were 4.9% (n = 2/41). A total of 6 balloon ruptures occurred (14.6%, n = 6 of 41). One rupture (16.7%, n = 1 of 6 of ruptures) lead to a technical failure and 2 ruptures (33.3%, n = 2 of 6 of ruptures) lead to an obliterative failure. Balloon rupture contributed to 50% of technical failures (n = 1/2, P =.274) and 33% of obliteration failures (n = 2/6, P =.148). In conclusion, the incidence of balloon-occlusion catheter rupture utilizing 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) and inventory unique to the United States is significantly higher than in Asia (<8% rupture rate). However, these ruptures have no significant technical or clinical consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-670
Number of pages7
JournalVascular and Endovascular Surgery
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration
  • clinical practice
  • varices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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