Balanced regulation of the CCN family of matricellular proteins: a novel approach to the prevention and treatment of fibrosis and cancer

Bruce L. Riser, Jeffrey L. Barnes, James Varani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The CCN family of matricellular signaling proteins is emerging as a unique common link across multiple diseases and organs related to injury and repair. They are now being shown to play a central role in regulating the pathways to the initiation and resolution of normal wound healing and fibrosis in response to multiple forms of injury. Similarly, it is also emerging that they play a key role in regulating the establishment, growth, metastases and tissue regeneration in many forms of cancer via the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor stroma. Evidence has been recently provided that these proteins do not act independently but are co-regulated working in a yin/yang manner to alter the outcome of both normal physiological processes as well as pathology. The purpose of this review is to twofold. First, it will summarize work to date supporting CCN2 as a therapeutic target in the formation and progression of renal, skin, and other organ fibrosis, as well as cancer stroma formation. Second, it will highlight recent evidence for CCN3 as a counter-regulator and a potential therapeutic agent in these diseases with an exciting, novel potential to both treat and then restore tissue homeostasis in those afflicted by these devastating disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-339
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cell Communication and Signaling
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

CCN Intercellular Signaling Proteins
Tissue homeostasis
Fibrosis
Tissue regeneration
Pathology
Tumors
Neoplasms
Skin
Proteins
Repair
Cells
Yin-Yang
Physiological Phenomena
Multiple Trauma
Therapeutics
Cell Communication
Wound Healing
Regeneration
Homeostasis
Neoplasm Metastasis

Keywords

  • Biotherapeutics
  • Cancer and tumor stroma
  • CCN2/CTGF
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetic nephropathy
  • Extracellular matrix pathobiology
  • Mesangial cells
  • Nephrogenic systemic sclerosis
  • Podocytes
  • Skin scarring
  • Tissue homeostasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Balanced regulation of the CCN family of matricellular proteins : a novel approach to the prevention and treatment of fibrosis and cancer. / Riser, Bruce L.; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Varani, James.

In: Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 327-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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