Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease

Laura A. Cox, Anthony G. Comuzzie, Lorena M. Havill, Genesio M. Karere, Kimberly D. Spradling, Michael C. Mahaney, Peter W. Nathanielsz, Daniel P. Nicolella, Robert E. Shade, Saroja Voruganti, John L. VandeBerg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major challenge for understanding susceptibility to common human diseases is determining genetic and environmental factors that influence mechanisms underlying variation in disease-related traits. The most common diseases afflicting the US population are complex diseases that develop as a result of defects in multiple genetically controlled systems in response to environmental challenges. Unraveling the etiology of these diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the many genetic and environmental factors involved. Studies of complex disease genetics in humans are challenging because it is not possible to control pedigree structure and often not practical to control environmental conditions over an extended period of time. Furthermore, access to tissues relevant to many diseases from healthy individuals is quite limited. The baboon is a well-established research model for the study of a wide array of common complex diseases, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and osteoporosis. It is possible to acquire tissues from healthy, genetically characterized baboons that have been exposed to defined environmental stimuli. In this review, we describe the genetic and physiologic similarity of baboons with humans, the ability and usefulness of controlling environment and breeding, and current genetic and genomic resources. We discuss studies on genetics of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and intrauterine growth restriction using the baboon as a model for human disease.We also summarize new studies and resources under development, providing examples of potential translational studies for targeted interventions and therapies for human disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberilt038
Pages (from-to)106-121
Number of pages16
JournalILAR Journal
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papio
Medical Genetics
human diseases
Epigenomics
epigenetics
osteoporosis
hypertension
environmental factors
obesity
Inborn Genetic Diseases
osteoarthritis
metabolic syndrome
heart diseases
genetic disorders
hyperlipidemia
Osteoporosis
pedigree
diabetes
etiology
Obesity

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes
  • Genomics resources
  • Hypertension
  • Intrauterine growth restriction
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Cox, L. A., Comuzzie, A. G., Havill, L. M., Karere, G. M., Spradling, K. D., Mahaney, M. C., ... VandeBerg, J. L. (2013). Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease. ILAR Journal, 54(2), 106-121. [ilt038]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ilar/ilt038

Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease. / Cox, Laura A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Havill, Lorena M.; Karere, Genesio M.; Spradling, Kimberly D.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Shade, Robert E.; Voruganti, Saroja; VandeBerg, John L.

In: ILAR Journal, Vol. 54, No. 2, ilt038, 11.2013, p. 106-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, LA, Comuzzie, AG, Havill, LM, Karere, GM, Spradling, KD, Mahaney, MC, Nathanielsz, PW, Nicolella, DP, Shade, RE, Voruganti, S & VandeBerg, JL 2013, 'Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease', ILAR Journal, vol. 54, no. 2, ilt038, pp. 106-121. https://doi.org/10.1093/ilar/ilt038
Cox LA, Comuzzie AG, Havill LM, Karere GM, Spradling KD, Mahaney MC et al. Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease. ILAR Journal. 2013 Nov;54(2):106-121. ilt038. https://doi.org/10.1093/ilar/ilt038
Cox, Laura A. ; Comuzzie, Anthony G. ; Havill, Lorena M. ; Karere, Genesio M. ; Spradling, Kimberly D. ; Mahaney, Michael C. ; Nathanielsz, Peter W. ; Nicolella, Daniel P. ; Shade, Robert E. ; Voruganti, Saroja ; VandeBerg, John L. / Baboons as a model to study genetics and epigenetics of human disease. In: ILAR Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. 2. pp. 106-121.
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