Attribution of blame, self-forgiving attitude and psychological adjustment in women with breast cancer

Lois C. Friedman, Catherine Romero, Richard M Elledge, Jenny Chang, Mamta Kalidas, Mario F. Dulay, Garrett R. Lynch, C. Kent Osborne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among self-blame for developing breast cancer, a self-forgiving attitude, mood, and quality of life among women with breast cancer. In this cross-sectional study, 123 women with Stages 0-III breast cancer completed questionnaires measuring demographic and medical characteristics, self-blame, self-forgiveness, mood, and quality of life. Women who blamed themselves reported more mood disturbance (p ≤ .001) and poorer quality of life (p < .001) than those who did not blame themselves. Mediational analyses revealed that self-blame for cancer partially mediated the relationships between a self-forgiving attitude and both mood disturbance and quality of life (Z = -2.72, p = .006 and Z = -2.89, p = .004, respectively). Patients may benefit from a discussion with their oncologists and other healthcare providers about self-forgiveness and the potential benefits of reducing self-blame to facilitate adjustment to breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-357
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Quality of Life
Forgiveness
Breast Neoplasms
Social Adjustment
Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Emotional Adjustment
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Psychological adjustment
  • Self-blame
  • Self-forgiveness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Friedman, L. C., Romero, C., Elledge, R. M., Chang, J., Kalidas, M., Dulay, M. F., ... Osborne, C. K. (2007). Attribution of blame, self-forgiving attitude and psychological adjustment in women with breast cancer. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 30(4), 351-357. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-007-9108-5

Attribution of blame, self-forgiving attitude and psychological adjustment in women with breast cancer. / Friedman, Lois C.; Romero, Catherine; Elledge, Richard M; Chang, Jenny; Kalidas, Mamta; Dulay, Mario F.; Lynch, Garrett R.; Osborne, C. Kent.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 351-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Friedman, LC, Romero, C, Elledge, RM, Chang, J, Kalidas, M, Dulay, MF, Lynch, GR & Osborne, CK 2007, 'Attribution of blame, self-forgiving attitude and psychological adjustment in women with breast cancer', Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 351-357. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-007-9108-5
Friedman, Lois C. ; Romero, Catherine ; Elledge, Richard M ; Chang, Jenny ; Kalidas, Mamta ; Dulay, Mario F. ; Lynch, Garrett R. ; Osborne, C. Kent. / Attribution of blame, self-forgiving attitude and psychological adjustment in women with breast cancer. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 351-357.
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