Associations of arterial tissue lipids with coronary heart disease risk factors in young people

Gray T. Malcom, C. Alex McMahan, Henry C. McGill, Edward E. Herderick, Richard E. Tracy, Dana A. Troxclair, Jack P. Strong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations of the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors with lipid composition of arterial tissue in 397 autopsied subjects 15-34 years of age from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study. Methods and results: We measured esterified cholesterol, free cholesterol, and phospholipid in the left circumflex coronary artery and two segments of the abdominal aorta, one of which is more susceptible to advanced atherosclerosis than the other, and also measured the major CHD risk factors. Non-HDL cholesterol concentration was positively associated, and HDL cholesterol concentration was negatively associated, with tissue lipids in the left circumflex coronary artery and the abdominal aorta. Hypertension was positively associated with tissue lipids in both arteries. Hyperglycemia was associated with tissue lipids in the left circumflex coronary artery and smoking with lipids in the abdominal aorta. PDAY risk scores summarize the effects of the CHD risk factors on advanced atherosclerosis. These risk scores, computed from the mutable risk factors, were associated with tissue lipids in the left circumflex coronary artery and both segments of the abdominal aorta. Conclusions: The CHD risk factors are associated with lipids in arterial tissue just as they are associated with gross and microscopic lesions. These results support the proposal that early control of risk factors is likely to prevent or delay progression of atherosclerosis and prevent or delay the onset of CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-521
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume203
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

Keywords

  • Abdominal aorta
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Left circumflex coronary artery
  • Risk factors
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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