Association of mildly reduced kidney function with cardiovascular disease: The framingham heart study

Feven Ataklte, Rebecca J. Song, Ashish Upadhyay, Ibrahim Musa Yola, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Vanessa Xanthakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Data are limited on the association of mildly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 60–89 mL/min per 1.73 m2) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the community. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated 3066 Framingham Offspring Study participants (55% women, mean age 58 years), without clinical CVD. Using multivariable regression, we related categories of mildly reduced eGFR (80–89, 70–79, or 60–69 versus ≥90 mL/min per 1.73 m2 [referent]) to prevalent coronary artery calcium, carotid intima media thickness, and left ventricular hypertrophy, and to circulating concentrations of cardiac stress biomarkers. We related eGFR categories to CVD incidence and to progression to ≥Stage 3 chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2) using Cox regression. Individuals with eGFR 60–69 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (n=320) had higher coronary artery calcium score (odds ratio 1.69; 95% CI 1.02–2.80) compared with the referent group. Individuals with eGFR 60–69 and 70–79 mL/min per 1.73 m2 had higher blood growth differentiating factor-15 concentrations (β=0.131 and 0.058 per unit-increase in log-biomarker, respectively). Participants with eGFR 60–69 and 80–89 mL/min per 1.73 m2 had higher blood B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations (β=0.119 and 0.116, respectively). On follow-up (median 16 years; 691 incident CVD and 252 chronic kidney disease events), individuals with eGFR 60–69 and 70–79 mL/min per 1.73 m2 experienced higher CVD incidence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02–1.93 and 1.45, 95% CI, 1.05–2.00, respectively, versus referent). Participants with eGFR 60–69 mL/min per 1.73 m2 experienced higher chronic kidney disease incidence (HR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.80–4.78 versus referent). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with mildly reduced eGFR 60–69 mL/min per 1.73 m2 have a higher burden of subclinical atherosclerosis cross-sectionally, and a greater risk of CVD and chronic kidney disease progression prospectively. Additional studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere020301
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume10
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Mild kidney disease
  • Subclinical disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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