Assessment of personality dimensions in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder using the junior temperament and character inventory

Rene L. Olvera, Manoela Fonseca, Sheila C. Caetano, John P Hatch, Kristina Hunter, Mark Nicoletti, Steven R. Pliszka, C. Robert Cloninger, Jair C. Soares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We compared temperament and character traits in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BP) and healthy control (HC) subjects. Method: Sixty nine subjects (38 BP and 31 HC), 8-17 years old, were assessed with the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime. Temperament and character traits were measured with parent and child versions of the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory. Results: BP subjects scored higher on novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and fantasy subscales, and lower on reward dependence, persistence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness compared to HC (all p < 0.007), by child and parent reports. These findings were consistent in both children and adolescents. Higher parent-rated novelty seeking, lower self-directedness, and lower cooperativeness were associated with co-morbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Lower parent-rated reward dependence was associated with co-morbid conduct disorder, and higher child-rated persistence was associated with co-morbid anxiety. Conclusions: These findings support previous reports of differences in temperament in BP children and adolescents and may assist in a greater understating of BP children and adolescents beyond mood symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-21
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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