Assessing Media Access and Use Among Latina Adolescents to Inform Development of a Physical Activity Promotion Intervention Incorporating Text Messaging

Cynthia M. Mojica, Deborah M Parra-medina, Zenong Yin, David Akopian, Laura A. Esparza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing physical activity (PA) during preadolescence and adolescence is critical to reversing the obesity epidemic. A recent report described the promising role of eHealth—the use of new media for purposes of health promotion—in reducing and preventing childhood obesity. This study assessed access/use of various media (cell phones, computers, gaming systems, Internet) among adolescent Latino girls and examined the relationship between PA and media access/use. A convenience sample of 110 Latino girls ages 11 to 14 was recruited from Girl Scouts of Southwest Texas and other groups. The media survey was self-administered (April-July 2010) on personal digital assistants. Of the girls, 55% reported owning a cell phone and spending 40 (SD = 4.2) hours per week talking, texting, listening to music, and browsing the Internet. Cell phone access increased significantly with age (p =.029). Compared to those with no cell phone, girls with a cell phone have greater odds of reporting more than 5 days of PA in the past week (odds ratio = 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1, 14) and engaging in daily physical education classes (odds ratio = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.9). Since girls with cell phones report greater PA, cell phones may be an effective strategy for communicating with girls about engaging in PA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-555
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014

Fingerprint

Text Messaging
Cell Phones
Hispanic Americans
Exercise
Internet
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Handheld Computers
Physical Education and Training
Pediatric Obesity
Computer Systems
Music
Obesity
Health

Keywords

  • child/adolescent health
  • chronic disease
  • community intervention
  • exercise
  • Latino
  • minority health
  • obesity
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Assessing Media Access and Use Among Latina Adolescents to Inform Development of a Physical Activity Promotion Intervention Incorporating Text Messaging. / Mojica, Cynthia M.; Parra-medina, Deborah M; Yin, Zenong; Akopian, David; Esparza, Laura A.

In: Health Promotion Practice, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.07.2014, p. 548-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mojica, Cynthia M. ; Parra-medina, Deborah M ; Yin, Zenong ; Akopian, David ; Esparza, Laura A. / Assessing Media Access and Use Among Latina Adolescents to Inform Development of a Physical Activity Promotion Intervention Incorporating Text Messaging. In: Health Promotion Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 548-555.
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