Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells: Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations

Eliezer Flescher, Donna Fossum, Patrick J. Gray, Gabriel Fernandes, Michael J K Harper, Norman Talal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspirin-like drugs (ALD) enhance T cell proliferation by suppressing PG production in monocytes. Normal human T cells do not produce any eicosanoids. Therefore we studied whether ALD would affect purified T cells directly. We found that ALD enhanced the proliferation and IL-2 production of T cells in the absence of monocytes. This effect did not depend on arachidonic acid metabolism as no lipoxygenase products and only nonsuppressive levels of cyclooxygenase products were detected in T cell cultures. Several possible mechanisms of the ALD effect were ruled out including 1) enhanced mitogen binding, 2) induction of activation markers (IL-2R, transferrin receptor, HLA-DR) on the cell surface, 3) down-regulation of suppressor cells. ALD caused a rise in [Ca2+]i which appeared to reflect an influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular milieu and was more pronounced in CD4+ cells. The rise in intracellular levels of Ca2+, that is considered a necessary second messenger for T cell activation, may prime these cells for an enhanced response to mitogens. In addition, ALD increased T cell membrane fluidity but only at higher concentrations than those found to enhance proliferation. The pharmacologic effect of ALD on T cells presents a possible new immunoenhancing potential of these drugs and may have therapeutic use in immunosuppressed individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2553-2559
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume146
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 15 1991

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Aspirin
Calcium
T-Lymphocytes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Mitogens
Monocytes
Membrane Fluidity
Transferrin Receptors
Lipoxygenase
Eicosanoids
Second Messenger Systems
HLA-DR Antigens
Therapeutic Uses
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Arachidonic Acid
Interleukin-2
Down-Regulation
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Proliferation
Cell Membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Flescher, E., Fossum, D., Gray, P. J., Fernandes, G., Harper, M. J. K., & Talal, N. (1991). Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells: Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. Journal of Immunology, 146(8), 2553-2559.

Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells : Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. / Flescher, Eliezer; Fossum, Donna; Gray, Patrick J.; Fernandes, Gabriel; Harper, Michael J K; Talal, Norman.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 146, No. 8, 15.04.1991, p. 2553-2559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flescher, E, Fossum, D, Gray, PJ, Fernandes, G, Harper, MJK & Talal, N 1991, 'Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells: Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations', Journal of Immunology, vol. 146, no. 8, pp. 2553-2559.
Flescher E, Fossum D, Gray PJ, Fernandes G, Harper MJK, Talal N. Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells: Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. Journal of Immunology. 1991 Apr 15;146(8):2553-2559.
Flescher, Eliezer ; Fossum, Donna ; Gray, Patrick J. ; Fernandes, Gabriel ; Harper, Michael J K ; Talal, Norman. / Aspirin-like drugs prime human T cells : Modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. In: Journal of Immunology. 1991 ; Vol. 146, No. 8. pp. 2553-2559.
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