Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study

R. D. Sanders, Y. H. Joo, L. Almasy, J. Wood, M. S. Keshavan, M. F. Pogue-Geile, R. C. Gur, R. E. Gur, V. L. Nimgaonkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Neurologic examination abnormalities (NEA) are more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia as well as their unaffected relatives when compared with healthy controls, suggesting that NEA may be endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We estimated the heritability of NEA in moderately sized pedigrees. We also evaluated correlations between NEA and cognitive performance in order to examine their construct validity. Methods: Members of eight extended families, each consisting of two first degree relatives with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorders, as well as available first- to fifth-degree relatives were examined (n = 96 participants). A modification of the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) was employed, augmented with localizing signs. Where feasible, we used untransformed data such as error counts and completion time, rather than ordinal measures. Heritability was estimated using the variance component method, implemented in SOLAR. Results: Statistically significant heritability (h2) estimates were obtained for several measures (p < 0.05, h2 ± standard error: rapid alternating movements, right-sided completion time, 0.99 ± 0.19; alternating fist-palm test, completion time, 0.77 ± 0.19 s, errors, 0.70 ± 0.32; fist-ring test, right-sided completion time, 0.53 ± 0.23 s, left-sided completion time, 0.70 ± 0.21 s; go-no go task, correct responses, 0.93 ± 0.33; audio-visual integration, correct responses, 0.79 ± 0.54). For most items, heritability analysis was hampered by insufficient data variability (infrequent errors). Correlational analyses show some degree of divergence among types of NEA, repetitive motor tasks being associated with most domains of cognitive functioning other than executive functioning, and cognitive-perceptual tasks being associated with memory and executive functioning. Conclusions: Significant familial influences on certain aspects of neurologic performance were detected. These heritable measures were also correlated with heritable neurocognitive measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-180
Number of pages9
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume86
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nervous System Malformations
Neurologic Examination
Schizophrenia
Endophenotypes
Pedigree
Psychotic Disorders
Nervous System

Keywords

  • Endophenotype
  • Genetic
  • Neurological soft signs
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Sanders, R. D., Joo, Y. H., Almasy, L., Wood, J., Keshavan, M. S., Pogue-Geile, M. F., ... Nimgaonkar, V. L. (2006). Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study. Schizophrenia Research, 86(1-3), 172-180. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2006.06.012

Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study. / Sanders, R. D.; Joo, Y. H.; Almasy, L.; Wood, J.; Keshavan, M. S.; Pogue-Geile, M. F.; Gur, R. C.; Gur, R. E.; Nimgaonkar, V. L.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 86, No. 1-3, 09.2006, p. 172-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanders, RD, Joo, YH, Almasy, L, Wood, J, Keshavan, MS, Pogue-Geile, MF, Gur, RC, Gur, RE & Nimgaonkar, VL 2006, 'Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study', Schizophrenia Research, vol. 86, no. 1-3, pp. 172-180. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2006.06.012
Sanders RD, Joo YH, Almasy L, Wood J, Keshavan MS, Pogue-Geile MF et al. Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study. Schizophrenia Research. 2006 Sep;86(1-3):172-180. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2006.06.012
Sanders, R. D. ; Joo, Y. H. ; Almasy, L. ; Wood, J. ; Keshavan, M. S. ; Pogue-Geile, M. F. ; Gur, R. C. ; Gur, R. E. ; Nimgaonkar, V. L. / Are neurologic examination abnormalities heritable? A preliminary study. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2006 ; Vol. 86, No. 1-3. pp. 172-180.
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AU - Pogue-Geile, M. F.

AU - Gur, R. C.

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