Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory isolates of Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States

J. H. Jorgensen, G. V. Doern, L. A. Maher, A. W. Howell, J. S. Redding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

298 Scopus citations

Abstract

A national surveillance study was conducted to determine trends in antimicrobial resistance patterns among three common causes of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Fifteen participating U.S. medical centers submitted clinically significant isolates of Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae to two central laboratories for testing with a group of 12 antimicrobial agents. The majority of isolates were recovered from adult males >50 years old. Overall, 84.1% of 378 M. catarrhalis and 16.5% of 564 H. influenzae (29.5% of type b strains; 15.0% of non-type b strains) produced β-lactamase and were thus resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin. Resistance in H. influenzae to other agents was 2.1% to tetracycline, 0.7% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 1.1% to cefaclor, and 0.2% to cefuroxime and amoxicillin-clavulanate, while the M. catarrhalis isolates yielded very low MICs of these latter drugs. As demonstrated in prior studies, erythromycin showed little activity against H. influenzae. Of 487 S. pneumoniae isolates, 1 (0.2%) was penicillin resistant, while 3.8% were relatively resistant to penicillin, 4.5% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 2.3% were resistant to tetracycline, 1.2% were resistant to chloramphenicol, and 0.2% were resistant to erythromycin. Overall, the lowest resistant rates for these common bacterial respiratory pathogens were noted with amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, and cefaclor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2075-2080
Number of pages6
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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