Antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins in rabbits with persistent osteomyelitis after treatment with demineralized bone implants

V. L. Thomas, B. A. Sanford, B. S. Keogh, R. G. Triplett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A rabbit model was used to study the effect of allogeneic demineralized bone powder (DBP) implants on the persistence of Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis. Thirty-one rabbits with chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia established by day 21, were started on systemic antibiotics followed by either no additional treatment or debridement plus either DBP (with or without supplemental antibiotics) or supplemental antibiotics only. On day 21, cultures showed a mean of 2 x 104 CFU/mg of debrided osseous material. By day 70, the treatment most effective in clearing infection was found in animals treated with supplemental antibiotics only (mean of 142 ± 116 CFU/mg). In contrast, infection persisted at a 7- to 10-fold-higher level in animals receiving DBP with and without supplemental antibiotics; these results suggest that DBP contributed to persistence of infection. Longitudinal sera were tested against staphylococcal sonic extracts by immunoblot. Detection of numerous probe-positive bands indicated complex but remarkably similar antibody responses among infected animals. Antibodies attached directly to the cell surfaces of staphylococci as shown by immunogold and blocked the binding of organisms of HEp-2 and human fetal lung cells in a radioadherence assay. Antibodies could be absorbed out by intact organisms and were unreactive by immunoblot against antigens derived from cells pretreated with pronase, proteinase K, or lysostaphin. These results indicate that the major response was directed against staphylococcal cell surface proteins. Surprisingly, only one major band (molecular weight, ~12,000) was detected when a homologous in vivo antigen preparation was studied by immunoblot. Antibody reactive against this peptide did not appear to react with staphylococci grown in vitro.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-412
Number of pages9
JournalInfection and immunity
Volume57
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus surface proteins in rabbits with persistent osteomyelitis after treatment with demineralized bone implants'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this