Anti-cariogenic effect of a cetylpyridinium chloride-containing nanoemulsion

Valerie A. Lee, Ramalingam Karthikeyan, Henry R Rawls, Bennett T Amaechi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the anticaries activity of a nanoemulsion composed of soybean oil, water, Triton X-100 and cetylpyridinium chloride. Methods: Tooth blocks (3 mm length × 3 mm width × 2 mm thickness) were cut from smooth surfaces of selected molar teeth using a water-cooled diamond wire saw. The blocks were randomly assigned to three experimental groups: (A) nanoemulsion, (B) 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, and (C) no treatment. The formation of dental caries in human tooth enamel was tested using a continuous flow dual-organism (Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei), biofilm model, which acts as an artificial mouth and simulates the biological and physiological activities observed within the oral environment. Experimental groups A and B were treated with their respective solutions once daily for 30 s on each occasion, while group C received no treatment. 10% sucrose was supplied every 6 h for 6 min to simulate meals and pH cycling. The experiment lasted for 5 days, and the tooth blocks were harvested and processed for demineralization assessment using transverse microradiography (TMR). Results: For both lesion depth and mineral loss, statistical analysis indicated that Emulsion was significantly lower than Control and Chlorhexidine, and Chlorhexidine was significantly lower than Control. Conclusions: We conclude that cetylpyridinium-containing nanoemulsions appear to present a feasible means of preventing the occurrence of early caries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-749
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Cetylpyridinium
Tooth
Chlorhexidine
Microradiography
Lactobacillus casei
Soybean Oil
Diamond
Streptococcus mutans
Water
Octoxynol
Dental Caries
Dental Enamel
Biofilms
Emulsions
Minerals
Meals
Sucrose
Mouth

Keywords

  • Artificial caries
  • Artificial mouth
  • Nanoemulsion
  • Transverse microradiography (TMR)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Anti-cariogenic effect of a cetylpyridinium chloride-containing nanoemulsion. / Lee, Valerie A.; Karthikeyan, Ramalingam; Rawls, Henry R; Amaechi, Bennett T.

In: Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 38, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 742-749.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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