Angular and fibrous particles in lung in relation to silica-induced diseases

A. Dufresne, R. Bégin, C. Dion, J. Jagirdar, W. N. Rom, P. Loosereewanich, D. C F Muir, A. C. Ritchie, G. Perrault

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The lung concentration of angular and fibrous particles was measured in cases of lung fibrosis only, in cases of lung fibrosis and lung cancer, and in cases of lung cancer only. These patients worked in different trades (mining, foundries, construction and were not a homogeneous group of exposed workers. Material and methods: Particles, both annular and fibrous, were extracted from lung parenchyma by a bleach digestion method, mounted on copper microscopic grids by a carbon replica technique, and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The quartz concentration was also determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on a silver membrane filter after extraction from the lung parenchyma. Results: (1) Lung cancer and lung fibrosis cases retained more metal-rich particles (P = 0.02) and more angular particles of all sorts (P = 0.009) than did lung fibrosis cases only, and the differences were statistically significant. (2) However, more quartz was retained in the lungs in lung fibrosis cases than in lung fibrosis or lung cancer cases, but the difference in the concentrations was not statistically significant. (3) More ferruginous bodies were retained in the lungs in lung cancer and lung fibrosis cases than in cases of lung fibrosis only, and the difference in the concentrations was statistically significant (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Results obtained from lung tissue must always be interpreted cautiously. However, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that workers in some trades such as foundries were exposed not only to quartz but also to asbestos, ceramic fibers, metal-rich non fibrous particles, and other likely carcinogenic chemicals. The wide range of particle types identified in the lungs of these workers illustrates the complexity of trying to determine disease origins in these work environments. Epidemiology studies have to control for the exposure to these carcinogens as well as for smoking habits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-269
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Silicon Dioxide
Lung
Fibrosis
Lung Neoplasms
Quartz
Replica Techniques
Metals
Asbestos
Ceramics
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Silver
X-Ray Diffraction
Carcinogens
Habits
Copper
Digestion
Spectrum Analysis
Epidemiology
Carbon
Smoking

Keywords

  • Angular and fibrous particles
  • Lung cancer
  • Silica
  • TEM-EDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Dufresne, A., Bégin, R., Dion, C., Jagirdar, J., Rom, W. N., Loosereewanich, P., ... Perrault, G. (1998). Angular and fibrous particles in lung in relation to silica-induced diseases. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 71(4), 263-269. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004200050279

Angular and fibrous particles in lung in relation to silica-induced diseases. / Dufresne, A.; Bégin, R.; Dion, C.; Jagirdar, J.; Rom, W. N.; Loosereewanich, P.; Muir, D. C F; Ritchie, A. C.; Perrault, G.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 71, No. 4, 06.1998, p. 263-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dufresne, A, Bégin, R, Dion, C, Jagirdar, J, Rom, WN, Loosereewanich, P, Muir, DCF, Ritchie, AC & Perrault, G 1998, 'Angular and fibrous particles in lung in relation to silica-induced diseases', International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, vol. 71, no. 4, pp. 263-269. https://doi.org/10.1007/s004200050279
Dufresne, A. ; Bégin, R. ; Dion, C. ; Jagirdar, J. ; Rom, W. N. ; Loosereewanich, P. ; Muir, D. C F ; Ritchie, A. C. ; Perrault, G. / Angular and fibrous particles in lung in relation to silica-induced diseases. In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 1998 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 263-269.
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AU - Rom, W. N.

AU - Loosereewanich, P.

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