Analyzing direct effects of education level and estimated IQ between cognitively intact Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic whites on a confrontational naming task

Paulina Vanessa Devora, Michael A. Motes, Robin C. Hilsabeck, Mitzi Gonzales, John Detoledo, Gladys Maestre, John Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Confrontational naming is widely used in diagnosing neurodegenerative disorders like MCI and dementia, and previous research indicates that healthy Non-Hispanic Whites outperform Hispanics in such tasks. However, understanding the factors contributing to score differences among ethnic groups remains limited. This study focuses on cognitively intact Mexican Americans and Non-Hispanic White older adults from the TARCC Hispanic Cohort project. Hierarchical regression analyses reveal that sex, age, ethnicity, education level, and estimated IQ significantly predict performance on the Boston Naming Test (BNT). Notably, education level and estimated IQ more strongly influence BNT performance in Mexican Americans than in Non-Hispanic Whites. When controlling for education level, estimated IQ has a more pronounced impact on BNT performance in aging Mexican Americans compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Conversely, after controlling for estimated IQ, the influence of education level is weaker for Mexican Americans than Non-Hispanic Whites. These findings emphasize the need for careful evaluation of confrontational naming task scores in diverse ethnic groups, emphasizing the critical role of education and estimated IQ in understanding performance disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalApplied neuropsychology. Adult
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Hispanic Americans
  • neuropsychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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