Analgesic, anxiolytic and anaesthetic effects of melatonin: New potential uses in pediatrics

Lucia Marseglia, Gabriella D’Angelo, Sara Manti, Salvatore Aversa, Teresa Arrigo, Russel J Reiter, Eloisa Gitto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exogenous melatonin is used in a number of situations, first and foremost in the treatment of sleep disorders and jet leg. However, the hypnotic, antinociceptive, and anticonvulsant properties of melatonin endow this neurohormone with the profile of a drug that modulates effects of anesthetic agents, supporting its potential use at different stages during anesthetic procedures, in both adults and children. In light of these properties, melatonin has been administered to children undergoing diagnostic procedures requiring sedation or general anesthesia, such as magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response tests and electroencephalogram. Controversial data support the use of melatonin as anxiolytic and antinociceptive agents in pediatric patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate available evidence relating to efficacy and safety of melatonin as an analgesic and as a sedative agent in children. Melatonin and its analogs may have a role in antinociceptive therapies and as an alternative to midazolam in premedication of adults and children, although its effectiveness is still controversial and available data are clearly incomplete.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1209-1220
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2015

Fingerprint

melatonin
anesthetics
Anesthetics
Pediatrics
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Melatonin
Analgesics
Hypnotics and Sedatives
sedatives
anticonvulsants
anesthesia
sleep
electroencephalography
Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Premedication
Midazolam
Magnetic resonance
Complementary Therapies
Electroencephalography
surgery

Keywords

  • Anaesthesia
  • Anxiety
  • Children
  • Melatonin
  • Pain
  • Premedication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Analgesic, anxiolytic and anaesthetic effects of melatonin : New potential uses in pediatrics. / Marseglia, Lucia; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Aversa, Salvatore; Arrigo, Teresa; Reiter, Russel J; Gitto, Eloisa.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 1, 06.01.2015, p. 1209-1220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marseglia, Lucia ; D’Angelo, Gabriella ; Manti, Sara ; Aversa, Salvatore ; Arrigo, Teresa ; Reiter, Russel J ; Gitto, Eloisa. / Analgesic, anxiolytic and anaesthetic effects of melatonin : New potential uses in pediatrics. In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 1209-1220.
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