An investigation of nebulized bronchodilator delivery using a pediatric lung model of spontaneous breathing

Ruben D. Restrepo, Stephen K. Dickson, Joseph L. Rau, Douglas S. Gardenhire

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: The literature lacks comparative data on nebulizer aerosol delivered via mask versus T-piece, to spontaneously breathing pediatric subjects. PURPOSE: To compare total inhaled drug mass delivered via standard pediatric aerosol mask versus via T-piece, with increasing distance. METHODS: We used a sample of 5 nebulizers, operated under manufacturers' conditions, with a standard pediatric aerosol mask and with a T-piece capped at one end, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm from an inhalation filter placed at the inlet of a pediatric test lung. Inhaled drug mass was analyzed with spectrophotometry. Aerosol particle size was measured separately from the breathing simulations, using a laser particle sizer to determine fine-particle mass (particles < 4.7 μm) and fine-particle fraction as percent of total mass. The fine-particle fraction was used to estimate the fine-particle mass. RESULTS: The mean ± SD values for inhaled drug mass as a percentage of nominal dose, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm, with the mask were 2.88 ± 0.79%, 1.61 ± 0.65%, and 1.3 ± 0.42%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 4.14 ± 1.37%, 3.77 ± 1.04%, and 3.47 ± 0.64%, respectively. There was a statistically greater inhaled drug mass with T-piece than with mask, overall (p < 0.01), and a significant decrease with mask or T-piece as distance increased (p < 0.01). The difference between mask and T-piece for inhaled drug mass at 2 cm was statistically significant (p < 0.018). The mean ± SD values for fine-particle mass estimated as a percentage of total drug mass at 0, 1, and 2 cm, with the mask were 1.39 ± 0.36%, 0.78 ± 0.29%, and 0.64 ± 0.20%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 2.1 ± 0.63%, 1.84 ± 0.45%, and 1.71 ± 0.27%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Inhaled drug mass was greater with T-piece than with a standard pediatric aerosol mask under the conditions studied.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)56-61
    Number of pages6
    JournalRespiratory Care
    Volume51
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Jan 2006

    Fingerprint

    Bronchodilator Agents
    Masks
    Respiration
    Pediatrics
    Lung
    Aerosols
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Nebulizers and Vaporizers
    Spectrophotometry
    Particle Size
    Inhalation
    Lasers

    Keywords

    • Aerosol
    • Infant
    • Mask
    • Pediatric
    • T-piece
    • Toddler

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

    Cite this

    Restrepo, R. D., Dickson, S. K., Rau, J. L., & Gardenhire, D. S. (2006). An investigation of nebulized bronchodilator delivery using a pediatric lung model of spontaneous breathing. Respiratory Care, 51(1), 56-61.

    An investigation of nebulized bronchodilator delivery using a pediatric lung model of spontaneous breathing. / Restrepo, Ruben D.; Dickson, Stephen K.; Rau, Joseph L.; Gardenhire, Douglas S.

    In: Respiratory Care, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 56-61.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Restrepo, RD, Dickson, SK, Rau, JL & Gardenhire, DS 2006, 'An investigation of nebulized bronchodilator delivery using a pediatric lung model of spontaneous breathing', Respiratory Care, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 56-61.
    Restrepo, Ruben D. ; Dickson, Stephen K. ; Rau, Joseph L. ; Gardenhire, Douglas S. / An investigation of nebulized bronchodilator delivery using a pediatric lung model of spontaneous breathing. In: Respiratory Care. 2006 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 56-61.
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    abstract = "BACKGROUND: The literature lacks comparative data on nebulizer aerosol delivered via mask versus T-piece, to spontaneously breathing pediatric subjects. PURPOSE: To compare total inhaled drug mass delivered via standard pediatric aerosol mask versus via T-piece, with increasing distance. METHODS: We used a sample of 5 nebulizers, operated under manufacturers' conditions, with a standard pediatric aerosol mask and with a T-piece capped at one end, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm from an inhalation filter placed at the inlet of a pediatric test lung. Inhaled drug mass was analyzed with spectrophotometry. Aerosol particle size was measured separately from the breathing simulations, using a laser particle sizer to determine fine-particle mass (particles < 4.7 μm) and fine-particle fraction as percent of total mass. The fine-particle fraction was used to estimate the fine-particle mass. RESULTS: The mean ± SD values for inhaled drug mass as a percentage of nominal dose, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm, with the mask were 2.88 ± 0.79{\%}, 1.61 ± 0.65{\%}, and 1.3 ± 0.42{\%}, respectively, and with the T-piece were 4.14 ± 1.37{\%}, 3.77 ± 1.04{\%}, and 3.47 ± 0.64{\%}, respectively. There was a statistically greater inhaled drug mass with T-piece than with mask, overall (p < 0.01), and a significant decrease with mask or T-piece as distance increased (p < 0.01). The difference between mask and T-piece for inhaled drug mass at 2 cm was statistically significant (p < 0.018). The mean ± SD values for fine-particle mass estimated as a percentage of total drug mass at 0, 1, and 2 cm, with the mask were 1.39 ± 0.36{\%}, 0.78 ± 0.29{\%}, and 0.64 ± 0.20{\%}, respectively, and with the T-piece were 2.1 ± 0.63{\%}, 1.84 ± 0.45{\%}, and 1.71 ± 0.27{\%}, respectively. CONCLUSION: Inhaled drug mass was greater with T-piece than with a standard pediatric aerosol mask under the conditions studied.",
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    N2 - BACKGROUND: The literature lacks comparative data on nebulizer aerosol delivered via mask versus T-piece, to spontaneously breathing pediatric subjects. PURPOSE: To compare total inhaled drug mass delivered via standard pediatric aerosol mask versus via T-piece, with increasing distance. METHODS: We used a sample of 5 nebulizers, operated under manufacturers' conditions, with a standard pediatric aerosol mask and with a T-piece capped at one end, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm from an inhalation filter placed at the inlet of a pediatric test lung. Inhaled drug mass was analyzed with spectrophotometry. Aerosol particle size was measured separately from the breathing simulations, using a laser particle sizer to determine fine-particle mass (particles < 4.7 μm) and fine-particle fraction as percent of total mass. The fine-particle fraction was used to estimate the fine-particle mass. RESULTS: The mean ± SD values for inhaled drug mass as a percentage of nominal dose, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm, with the mask were 2.88 ± 0.79%, 1.61 ± 0.65%, and 1.3 ± 0.42%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 4.14 ± 1.37%, 3.77 ± 1.04%, and 3.47 ± 0.64%, respectively. There was a statistically greater inhaled drug mass with T-piece than with mask, overall (p < 0.01), and a significant decrease with mask or T-piece as distance increased (p < 0.01). The difference between mask and T-piece for inhaled drug mass at 2 cm was statistically significant (p < 0.018). The mean ± SD values for fine-particle mass estimated as a percentage of total drug mass at 0, 1, and 2 cm, with the mask were 1.39 ± 0.36%, 0.78 ± 0.29%, and 0.64 ± 0.20%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 2.1 ± 0.63%, 1.84 ± 0.45%, and 1.71 ± 0.27%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Inhaled drug mass was greater with T-piece than with a standard pediatric aerosol mask under the conditions studied.

    AB - BACKGROUND: The literature lacks comparative data on nebulizer aerosol delivered via mask versus T-piece, to spontaneously breathing pediatric subjects. PURPOSE: To compare total inhaled drug mass delivered via standard pediatric aerosol mask versus via T-piece, with increasing distance. METHODS: We used a sample of 5 nebulizers, operated under manufacturers' conditions, with a standard pediatric aerosol mask and with a T-piece capped at one end, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm from an inhalation filter placed at the inlet of a pediatric test lung. Inhaled drug mass was analyzed with spectrophotometry. Aerosol particle size was measured separately from the breathing simulations, using a laser particle sizer to determine fine-particle mass (particles < 4.7 μm) and fine-particle fraction as percent of total mass. The fine-particle fraction was used to estimate the fine-particle mass. RESULTS: The mean ± SD values for inhaled drug mass as a percentage of nominal dose, at 0 cm, 1 cm, and 2 cm, with the mask were 2.88 ± 0.79%, 1.61 ± 0.65%, and 1.3 ± 0.42%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 4.14 ± 1.37%, 3.77 ± 1.04%, and 3.47 ± 0.64%, respectively. There was a statistically greater inhaled drug mass with T-piece than with mask, overall (p < 0.01), and a significant decrease with mask or T-piece as distance increased (p < 0.01). The difference between mask and T-piece for inhaled drug mass at 2 cm was statistically significant (p < 0.018). The mean ± SD values for fine-particle mass estimated as a percentage of total drug mass at 0, 1, and 2 cm, with the mask were 1.39 ± 0.36%, 0.78 ± 0.29%, and 0.64 ± 0.20%, respectively, and with the T-piece were 2.1 ± 0.63%, 1.84 ± 0.45%, and 1.71 ± 0.27%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Inhaled drug mass was greater with T-piece than with a standard pediatric aerosol mask under the conditions studied.

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