An evaluation of the effectiveness of patient-controlled analgesia after spinal surgery.

C. L. White, R. P. Pokrupa, M. H. Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Sixty patients undergoing spinal surgery were randomly assigned to receive PCA or the standard approach to postoperative analgesia (intramuscular injections on an "as needed" basis). Information on pain intensity at rest and with activity, total daily amount of analgesia, presence of adverse effects, length of time to ambulation and length of hospital stay was collected on all patients. Patients in the PCA group reported lower levels of pain, both at rest and with activity, and were ambulating earlier than patients receiving standard analgesia. There were no differences between the groups in total daily analgesic intake, presence of adverse effects and length of hospital stay. These data suggest that PCA is a safe, effective approach to managing pain after spinal surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-232
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of neuroscience nursing : journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medical–Surgical

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