Alteration of the menstrual cycle in baboons placed on tethering devices and moved to individual housing - A stress model for a follicular phase defect

L. Caperton, C. Eddy, M. M. Leland, K. D. Carey, J. R. McCarrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: During an attempt to identify endocrine characteristics in the baboon that would more precisely predict ovulatory status for assisted reproductive techniques, we observed severe alterations in the menstrual cycle length upon introducing an environmental stress. This environmental stress involved moving animals from their baseline gang cage environment to individual indoor caging and placing them on a tethering apparatus. Methods: Five adult female baboons were followed for changes in sex skin indicative of menstrual cycle timing and move from outdoor gang gages to individual indoor cages during the early follicular phase of their cycle. A tether device including a surgically implanted cannula was then installed to facilitate daily blood draws without sedation. Radioimmuonoassays were performed to monitor serum estradiol levels and lapraroscopic surveillance was used to confirm time of ovulation. Results: Complete data sets were collected from four of the female baboons. In each case, a prolongation of the menstrual cycle was noted either during the cycle during which the females were moved to indoor caging or during the cycle immediately following the move. This prolongation was isolated to the follicular phase of the affected cycle. Conclusions: We conclude that otherwise normal handling procedures, including movement to new caging, and/or installation of a tether device, can impart a stress effect on reproductively cycling adult female baboons, such that folliculogenesis is delayed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-345
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of medical primatology
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Keywords

  • Assisted reproduction
  • Baboon
  • Non-human primate
  • Ovulation
  • Reproduction
  • Reproductive stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

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