Adiponectin pathway polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer in African Americans and Hispanics in the Women's Health Initiative

Virginia G. Kaklamani, Thomas J. Hoffmann, Timothy A. Thornton, Geoffrey Hayes, Rowan Chlebowski, Linda Van Horn, Christos Mantzoros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adiponectin, a protein secreted by the adipose tissue, is an endogenous insulin sensitizer with circulating levels that are decreased in obese and diabetic subjects. Recently, circulating levels of adiponectin have been correlated with breast cancer risk. Our previous work showed that polymorphisms of the adiponectin pathway are associated with breast cancer risk. We conducted the first study of adiponectin pathways in African Americans and Hispanics in the Women's Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource cohort of 3,642 self-identified Hispanic women and 8,515 self-identified African American women who provided consent for DNA analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from three genes were included in this analysis: ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, and ADIPOR2. The genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 (909,622 SNPs) (www.affymetrix.com) was used. We found that rs1501299, a functional SNP of ADIPOQ that we previously reported was associated with breast cancer risk in a mostly Caucasian population, was also significantly associated with breast cancer incidence (HR for the GG/TG genotype: 1.23; 95 % CI 1.059-1.43) in African American women. We did not find any other SNPs in these genes to be associated with breast cancer incidence. This is the first study assessing the role of adiponectin pathway SNPs in breast cancer risk in African Americans and Hispanics. RS1501299 is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in African American women. As the rates of obesity and diabetes increase in African Americans and Hispanics, adiponectin and its functional SNPs may aid in breast cancer risk assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-468
Number of pages8
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • African Americans
  • Breast cancer
  • Hispanics
  • Polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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