Acupressure bands do not improve chemotherapy-induced nausea control in pediatric patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy: A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial

L. Lee Dupuis, Kara M. Kelly, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Anne Marie Langevin, Roy N. Tamura, Ping Xu, Lu Chen, E. Anders Kolb, Nicole J. Ullrich, Olle Jane Z. Sahler, Eleanor Hendershot, Ann Stratton, Lillian Sung, Thomas W. McLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remain common, distressing side effects of chemotherapy. It has been reported that acupressure prevents chemotherapy-induced nausea in adults, but it has not been well studied in children. METHODS: In this multicenter, prospective, randomized, single-blind, sham-controlled trial, the authors compared acute-phase nausea severity in patients ages 4 to 18 years who were receiving highly emetic chemotherapy using standard antiemetic agents combined with acupressure wrist bands, the most common type of acupressure, versus sham bands. Patients wore acupressure or sham bands continuously on each day of chemotherapy and for up to 7 days afterward. Chemotherapy-induced nausea severity in the delayed phase and chemotherapy-induced vomiting control in the acute and delayed phases also were compared. RESULTS: Of the 187 patients randomized, 165 contributed nausea severity assessments during the acute phase. Acupressure bands did not reduce the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea in the acute phase (odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence limits, 0.89-2.00, in which an OR <1.00 favored acupressure) or in the delayed phase (OR, 1.23; 95% CL, 0.75-2.01). Furthermore, acupressure bands did not improve daily vomiting control during the acute phase (OR, 1.57; 95% CL, 0.95-2.59) or the delayed phase (OR, 0.84; 95% CL, 0.45-1.58). No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Acupressure bands were safe but did not improve chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting in pediatric patients who were receiving highly emetic chemotherapy. Cancer 2018;124:1188-96.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1196
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume124
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2018

Keywords

  • acupressure
  • chemotherapy
  • nausea
  • pediatrics
  • supportive care
  • vomiting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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