Activation of map3k dlk and lzk in purkinje cells causes rapid and slow degeneration depending on signaling strength

Yunbo Li, Erin M. Ritchie, Christopher L. Steinke, Cai Qi, Lizhen Chen, Binhai Zheng, Yishi Jin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The conserved MAP3K Dual leucine zipper kinases can activate JNK via MKK4 or MKK7. Vertebrate DLK and LZK share similar biochemical activities and undergo auto-activation upon increased expression. Depending on cell-type and nature of insults DLK and LZK can induce pro-regenerative, pro-apoptotic or pro-degenerative responses, although the mechanistic basis of their action is not well understood. Here, we investigated these two MAP3Ks in cerebellar Purkinje cells using loss-and gain-of function mouse models. While loss of each or both kinases does not cause discernible defects in Purkinje cells, activating DLK causes rapid death and activating LZK leads to slow degeneration. Each kinase induces JNK activation and caspase-mediated apoptosis independent of each other. Significantly, deleting CELF2, which regulates alternative splicing of Map2k7, strongly attenuates Purkinje cell degeneration induced by LZK, but not DLK. Thus, controlling the activity levels of DLK and LZK is critical for neuronal survival and health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-70
Number of pages70
JournaleLife
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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